Election Outlook:  More about Identification Requirements for Voting  |  Early voting for the May 24, 2022 Primary Runoff Election runs from Monday, May 16, 2022 – Friday, May 20, 2022  |  What’s on the Ballot?  |  Am I Registered to Vote?  |  Find My Polling Place  |  Election Results  |  Voter Information  |  Voting Issues for Texas Evacuees Due to Natural Disasters  |  Texas Election Security Update

Secretary Scott Issues Statement on Reported Delay in Harris County Vote Counting

March 1, 2022
Contact: Sam Taylor
512-463-6116

AUSTIN — Under Texas law, all Texas counties are required to report early and Election Day results within 24 hours of polls closing on Election Night. Today, the Texas Secretary of State's office was informed that Harris County election officials would not be able to count and report results for all early and Election Day votes by the statutory deadline of 7:00 P.M. on Wednesday, March 2, 2022. Texas Secretary of State John Scott issued the following statement and offered assistance to Harris County in ensuring that all ballots are timely tabulated in accordance with state law:

"We are closely monitoring the progress of ballot tabulation in Harris County to ensure all relevant election laws are followed and that legitimately cast ballots by Harris County voters in both the Democratic and Republican Primary Elections are counted accurately and timely," Secretary Scott said. "Harris County election officials have indicated to our office that the delay in ballot tabulation is due only to damaged ballot sheets that must be duplicated before they can be scanned by ballot tabulators at the central count location. Our office stands ready to assist Harris County election officials, and all county election officials throughout the state, in complying with Texas Election Code requirements for accurately tabulating and reporting Primary Election results. We want to ensure that all Texans who have cast a ballot in this year's Primary Elections can have confidence in the accuracy of results."

Section 66.053 of the Texas Election Code, which has been law since at least 1986, requires that precinct election records be delivered to the appropriate authority, in this case the respective parties holding primary elections, not later than 24 hours after the polls close in each election. Failing to deliver the precinct election returns to the appropriate authority by the deadline is a Class B Misdemeanor.

Section 65.002 of the Texas Election Code, which has been law since 2009, requires that the counting of ballots be conducted continuously until all ballots are counted.

Section 31.005 of the Texas Election Code, which has been law since at least 1986, empowers the Texas Secretary of State to order a person performing official functions in the administration of any part of the electoral processes to correct offending conduct if the secretary determines that the person is exercising the powers vested in that person in a manner that delays or cancels an election that the person does not have specific statutory authority to delay or cancel, unless acting under an order of a court of competent jurisdiction.

While Texas law allows provisional ballots and corrected mail-in ballots to be counted up to six days after Election Day, early votes and Election Day votes must be counted within 24 hours of the polls closing on Election Day (Sec. 66.053).

To view Election Night Returns as counties report their results through the Texas Secretary of State's portal, click here.

Learn more about what to expect on Election Night in Texas.

###