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ICYMI: Secretary Whitley Participates In Voting Rights History Tour In Alabama With Secretaries Of State

"Experiencing the history of the voting rights movement where it actually took place is extremely impactful"

May 13, 2019
Contact: Sam Taylor
512-463-6116

Secretary Whitley sitting in a church with other NASS members.
(Secretary Whitley joins state election officials from
across the nation at the 16th Street Baptist Church
in Birmingham, Alabama.
PHOTO CREDIT: Spencer Williams)


Secretary Whitley standing with other  statewide election officals
(Secretary Whitley tours the Birmingham
Civil Rights Institute.
PHOTO CREDIT: Spencer Williams)


Secretary Whitley poses for a photo with Denise Miller, Connecticut Secretary of State and David Becker, Election Innovation & Research Executive Director
(From left to right: Connecticut Secretary of State
Denise Merrill, Center for Election Innovation &
Research Executive Director David Becker, and
Texas Secretary of State David Whitley.
PHOTO CREDIT: Spencer Williams
)

AUSTIN, TX – Last week, Texas Secretary of State David Whitley joined 19 other statewide election officials from across the nation to participate in the first-ever voting rights history tour in Alabama. The tour, hosted by Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson and Alabama Secretary of State John H. Merrill and supported by the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS), explored the history of the voting rights movement in the United States and brought together secretaries of state, civil rights leaders, faith leaders, and elected officials to reflect upon the struggles, sacrifices, and successes of voting rights leaders in the early 1960s and beyond. Secretary Whitley thanked the hosts and organizers of the tour for working together to educate state election officials on the history of the voting rights movement.

“Experiencing the history of the voting rights movement where it actually took place is extremely impactful," Secretary Whitley said. "I was particularly moved by those who faced unimaginable hatred and responded with grace, dignity, and determination. Being able to participate in this tour with my colleagues nationwide has been a distinct honor, and I would like to thank NASS as well as Secretaries Benson and Merrill for putting together this important event.”

Read more about the 2019 Voting Rights History Tour.

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